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Sebastian Kruger

In the early 1980’s Krüger studied painting and graphic arts, and then quickly moved into the professional art world where his iconic ‘personality portraits’ continue to captivate famous collectors and audiences across the continents. Krüger approaches nearly all of his subjects with a level of respect and sincerity contrasting the often extreme exaggeration of their features. The result is the creation of visually and psychologically explosive ‘Krugerized’ portraits.

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KRUGER BLOG

March 25, 2008 Posted by | art | Leave a comment

Ernie Barnes

Sometime last year i presented u my “new discovery” (@ that point in time) : Justin Bua!!!

A few months ago i finally could buy his book The Beat of Urban Art – The Art of Justin Bua and since i got it im all over it!IT IS AMAZING!!!

Right now its like 3:40 AM and im all over the book!(is this obsession?)…but ‘neway when i got to the Jazz Quintet picture , my mind took me back in time like 3 or 4 years when one of my friends(Dephu !!!big ups bro!!!) introduced me (than) to a fantasy world…the world of Ernie Barnes

so as usual a likkle sum sum ’bout Ernie Barnes than ill post the link to his website where u can and i hope u will as well as i hope u will check justin’s website!

ERNIE BARNES

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Ernest Eugene Barnes Jr. was born July 15, 1938, in a poor section (“the bottom”) of Durham, North Carolina. His father, Ernest Barnes Sr., worked as a shipping clerk at Liggett Myers Tobacco Company and his mother, Fannie Mae Geer, was employed as a domestic for Frank Fuller Jr., a wealthy Southern attorney who would guide Barnes into the world of art.

On days when Fannie Mae allowed her son to accompany her to work, Fuller would talk to young Ernest “about art and life. He would call me into his study and allow me to look through his art books. I enjoyed this room of polished, mahogany walls with leather chairs, shelves of leather-bound books and the sound of classical music. He would tell me about the various schools of art, his favorite painters, the museums he visited and other things my mind couldn’t quite comprehend at the age of seven,” the artist recalls. So it was particularly surprising when Fuller, as a member of the local school board, voted against school desegregation. “He told my mother he didn’t think ‘the Whites are ready.'”

By the time Barnes entered the first grade, he was familiar with the works of such masters as Toulouse-Lautrec, Delacroix, Rubens, and Michelangelo. By the time he entered junior high, he could appreciate, as well as decode, many of the cherished masterpieces within the walls of museums — although it would be a half dozen more years before he was allowed entrance because of his race.

Unusual for a lower-middle class child growing up in the segregated South of the 1940s, Barnes’ mother believed in education and exposure to the arts. “She tried to get me to do all the things that would make me a culturally enriched person. She pushed me in the direction of art and music. I took lessons in tap dancing, saxophone, trombone, violin and piano,” he says, noting with a laugh that he mastered none of them. Early on, however, he showed a talent for art. “I was never in class. I was always off somewhere decorating stuff.”

Overweight and extremely introverted, Barnes was a target for ridicule from the time he started the first grade through his junior year in high school, continually seeking refuge in his sketchbooks.

“They hated me,” he says of his classmates. “My mother escorted me to school ten times before I could accept the fact that I had to stay there. I couldn’t conform easily to the athletic ideal and was made to feel inadequate. I wasn’t able to fight, to run fast, nor was I picked for rough games. I was introverted and shy. If there was a day that I did not come home in tears because of a fight, it could be attributed to sickness, the weekend, or it was rained out. I was beaten so severely, my mother requested that I be allowed to leave school fifteen minutes before the other kids, and permission was granted.

“When I was at home and drawing, I was happy. My senses addressed themselves naturally to the discovery of what I could make happen on paper. It was so easy. From the shrouded mists of my sensitivity, I made friends with lines, allowing them to flow into things belonging to my immediate environment; the trees, clouds, birds and people. In school, nobody laughed and made fun of me when I was drawing. They just watched in silent awe.”

At the age of 13 came the rude awakening that the only way of getting a girlfriend was by exerting his prowess through sports. Even then, he says, “the athlete was respected as the finest embodiment of one’s African heritage. There were those convinced that the only way to heaven was with a football or basketball. Most definitely a bat. On any given day, the number one question on the block was, ‘Hey, man. What did the Mays do today?’ or ‘Did you see the way the brother was running?’ Any Black male worth giving the time of day owed it to his race to at least make an attempt to hit ‘The Gipper’ as soon as he touched the ball.”

Unfortunately, the sensitive young man could not avoid the issue forever. Nature had played a cruel trick; Barnes had grown too tall to overlook. He finally reported to the coach’s office, got weighed, assigned a locker, and outfitted with pads, helmet and practice gear. Dismally out of shape and lacking the killer instinct necessary to survive serious injuries on the field, he quit after two practice sessions.

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 ERNIE BARNES WEBSITE

March 25, 2008 Posted by | art | Leave a comment